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I’m taking a Facebook and Twitter sabbatical

June 18, 2012

I’m taking a sabbatical from Facebook, Twitter, email alerts and other wonderful but distracting digital chores. The idea is to spend more time with my family of writing projects. I hope to be posting some of the work in progress on this blog, but most of the labour will take place behind the scenes until it appears in the form of publications.

So far I haven’t experienced any of the withdrawal symptoms reported in the press for similarly heroic efforts. In fact, I feel joyfully unburdened, although I should add that (a) it’s only been 6 days, so withdrawal may still hit me in the coming days or weeks, and (b) I haven’t given up on the Internet, fate forbid; I’m only taking a break from some of my Internet haunts.

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6 Comments leave one →
  1. June 18, 2012 9:10 am

    Sabbatical usually takes a year. Can you sabbatical from these apps for a year?

  2. June 18, 2012 9:35 am

    Thanks Slaksmi. Yes, one year sounds like a sensible writing period away from such distractions. If I can still live happily without them after 12 months I may extend it, although I suspect as soon as I start another research project (whatever the topic) I will need them again!

  3. June 18, 2012 9:47 am

    ps. I won’t close my accounts, but will cease to be a user other than in exceptional circumstances, say, for instance, I need to get hold of someone urgently and a Twitter/FB message is the best means (this happens rarely).

  4. June 18, 2012 12:01 pm

    Sabbaticals in general are quite useful, as they help you take a step back. The difficulty is usually with other people trying to reach you while you’re on sabbatical. In your case, it’s quite possible that email will fill the void. Let’s just hope your email doesn’t end up being overwhelming.

  5. June 20, 2012 10:07 pm

    Shhh, don’t give them ideas! 🙂

    Update: I’m finding that now that I can’t hang out on Twitter or Facebook, I spend far too long on the BBC news website on the lookout for ‘breaking news’ updates (which can’t be too healthy).

    At any rate, nothing beats a morning spent in a reasonably quiet library with no internet access and your mobile switched off. Just you and your writing. For matters other than emergencies, I find that the net can usually wait till the afternoon or evening.

    How do *you* cope with the digital deluge, enkerli?

  6. June 22, 2012 11:08 am

    Erm, enkerli? Are you still there? Don’t tell me you’re taking a leaf out of my book and withdrawing from the blogosphere for a while. If so, all the best with it!

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